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How Cuba Helped Black People Across the World

cuba-military-3Reported by Liku Zelleke

One of the many reasons Cuba was restricted from trade was due to its support and direct involvement in events that countered western authority.

Some of the events, which resulted in trade embargoes and sanctions that nearly crippled Cuba’s economy, may in fact surprise you.  Lets take a look at a few.

-During the Angolan War of Independence, Cuba armed the People’s Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), sending its own soldiers to fight alongside local forces.

-In 1975, South Africa, with the blessings of the US government, invaded Angola to overthrow the leftist MPLA government.

-In 1988 Cuba lent support to the Soviet Union, aiding in a victory that led to the downfall of apartheid, and destroying the illusion of white invincibility.  Cuba also backed the African National Congress (ANC) and Nelson Mandela directly.

-When Joanne Chesimard, a.k.a. Assata Shakur, fled New Jersey – where she is to this date wanted for the killing of state trooper Werner Foerster – it was Cuba that she fled to, and where she was granted amnesty by Fidel Castro.

Cubans have shown their solidarity with black movements across the world.  Not only have they assisted in times of war and politics, they have also lent knowledge and provided volunteers all over Africa and Latin America for medicinal support.

The island nation has gone as far to offer scholarships to low-income Americans, noting that it wouldn’t have been necessary if the medical schools in the U.S. would open their doors wider to minorities.

“Cuba didn’t create the discrimination against Black people by U.S. medical schools. That’s a U.S. phenomenon,” said the late Rev. Lucius Walker, former executive director of the Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization, who oversaw the program from the United States.

In 1960, while in New York  for a United Nations meeting, Castro became incited by the unwelcoming service that he received at the hotel reserved for his stay. To find better service and sympathy for his cause, Castro and his entourage stormed out and headed to the Theresa Hotel in Harlem, where they found solace and support in the African American community.

Cuba isn’t the only country considered a rogue nation by the West in South America. Even now, Venezuela is still under sanctions.  The primary support it has received has been from the Cuban government.

Read more here.

 

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